Documents of interest for current or prospective customers of the Kairos™, Talea™ and Telos™


Kairos™ Mounting Templates

Here are the drawings for the mounting templates of the Kairos™:

Durand Tonearms_Turntable assembly with Kairos mounting holes positions
Durand Tonearms_Turntable assembly with Kairos with armwand

Mounting template to determine height of arm board for the Kairos™:

Durand Tonearms_Turntable assembly with Kairos side view

Kairos™ Arc Protractors

The protractor needed for the Kairos™ is the same as the one for the Talea™. Please see in section "Talea™ Arc Proctators" for download of the protractor.

Talea™ User Guide

pdf download of the first generation Talea™ User Guide (updated September 2010):

Talea_User_Guide


pdf download of the Talea™ II (second generation) User Guide (updated May 2012):

Durand Tonearms Talea 2ndgen User Guide

Talea™ Mounting Templates

Here are the mounting templates for the Talea:
- the first one is for metal armboards/plinths (using two 10-24 socket head cap screws)
- the second one is for wood armboards/plinths (using four #8 screws).
The files can be downloaded in pdf format.

Mounting template for metal armboards:
Durand Tonearms TALEA mounting template metal armboard

Mounting template for wood armboards:

Durand Tonearms TALEA mounting template wood armboard

Mounting template to determine height of arm board for the Talea™:

Durand Tonearms Talea mounting template 3

This gives an idea on the mounting position for the Talea™.
Please get in touch with your dealer if you have any further question about mounting.

Talea™ Arc Protractors

Here is the arc protractor that is provided with the Talea™ and the Kairos™, based on Löfgren A (aka Baerwald) geometry. If you need another one, you can download the file, and print it on card stock or other heavy paper.
Make sure your setting allows for printing at 100%. To ensure that the protractor is printed at the correct scale, there are two lines, one horizontal and one vertical, that are both 200 mm. Check them with a ruler before using the protractor. Any error in printer scaling will result in wrong geometry.
Durand Tonearms Talea Arc protractor Lofgren A

Telos™ Mounting Templates

Mounting templates for the Telos:
The first drawing indicates the mounting position of the tonearm on the plinth/armboard; the second one gives the position of the mounting holes on the base plate itself. These should give you an idea if your turntable is large enough to accommodate the Telos. The third one indicates the height needed for the top surface of the armboard, in relation to the top of the platter.
The files can be downloaded in pdf formats.

Tonearm position:
Durand Tonearms_Turntable assembly with TELOS mounting holes positions

Telos on turntable, side view:
Durand Tonearms_Turntable assembly with TELOS Side view

Telos base plate:
Durand Tonearms_TELOS base plate dimensions

Telos™ Arc Protractors

You can download here the drawing for the arc protractor based on the same geometry as the protractor provided with the Telos™ (Löfgren A geometry).
If you want to print this file, make sure your printer software is set to print without any reduction. To ensure that the protractor is printed at the correct scale, there are two lines, one horizontal and one vertical, that are both 200 mm. Check them with a ruler before using the protractor. Any error in printer scaling will result in wrong geometry.
Arc protractor Durand Tonearms - Telos™ Lofgren A

If you would like to experiment with the Löfgren B geometry,you can download this file, for an arc protractor based on this geometry. Please note that you will need to adjust the pivot-spindle distance accordingly. The pivot-spindle jig provided with the tonearm should NOT be used for this purpose. We do not offer a pivot-spindle tool for Löfgren B geometry.
Arc protractor Durand Tonearms - Telos™ Lofgren B

Tips and Tricks / Talea

In this section, we will provide ideas for getting the best sound from the Talea™.
Feel free to let us know if you found some good ideas and we'll share them with everybody. Thank you!



Anti-skating


(photo Michael Cole © 2010)

The Talea™ is delivered with two small weights to be used for anti-skating (aka bias) adjustment. Which one to choose depends on your cartridge, so it's impossible to give any general advice. Use your ears to detect any distortion in one channel or the other; if you hear some distortion in the left channel on very dynamic passages, you probably need a bit more anti-skating compensation. If it's in the right channel, you might have too much.

Remember that some records (specially those bought used) can have been previously damaged by excessive force and no amount of anti-skating will improve them.

With some cartridges, you might need very little anti-skating compensation. One solution that has worked well is to use small rubber o-rings instead of a brass weight. You will need o-rings with an inner diameter of 3/32"; they are easy to find (for example at McMaster Carr, part number 9452K317) and you can choose how many you need, depending on your cartridge and your preference. As an example, we have now established that with the Ortofon A90, just one of these o-rings toward the end of the anti-skating rod seems to provide the best results. Fast transients in particular (attacks on drums, and such) are more natural and "free" with that solution.
For reference, the small brass weight provided with the tonearm weighs 2.6 g; one 3/32" o-ring weighs ca. 0.11 g

On the subject of anti-skating, one of our dealers shares his experience with a Dynavector XV-1S:

"The 3/32 o-rings I have are thick and weigh .17 grams each. I'm finding that two o-rings toward the end of the AS shaft, and with the string in the second groove in on the AZ balance shaft gives a very close to 3-D presentation on better recorded LPs. I start to hear a decline in mid-bass definition when I go to the third o-ring."

If you like to tune by ear, you might notice that variations in anti-skating force have an effect on the resulting tone. Sometimes, a higher weight will yield more body, but also a slightly darker color. Going too far in that direction will eventually render the sound dull and slow. In the other direction, little weight can make the sound less substantial. With each cartridge, there is a happy moment where it seems to be better centered in the groove, dynamic and flowing. This will vary somewhat across the record, but not necessarily as much as one would think...

Tips and Tricks / Telos

In this section, we will provide ideas for getting the best sound from the Telos™.
Feel free to let us know if you found some good ideas and we'll share them with everybody. Thank you!

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Azimuth clamp

The azimuth clamp is the part that is placed around the bearing column. It supports the azimuth adjustment mechanism, which is comprised of two vertical posts and a cross bar on which rests the azimuth rod (the rod that is attached to the side of the arm wand) in normal operation. This clamp is used to adjust azimuth:

- When the azimuth clamp is lowered, the azimuth rod comes down as well and the arm wand rotates counter-clockwise.

- When the azimuth clamp is raised, the cross bar on which the azimuth rod rests pushes it up and the arm wand rotates clockwise.


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Azimuth weight

The Telos™ is delivered with small azimuth weights. One of these weights is to be placed on the azimuth rod, so that the azimuth bar is resting on the cross bar. In general, it seems that the middle weight, placed at about mid-point on the azimuth rod works best with most cartridges. Sometimes it needs to be even closer to the cross bar, sometimes closer to the arm wand. This is very variable and will depend on your cartridge (weight, compliance, age), so feel free to experiment and determine what sounds best for you.
As with anti-skating, tune the position of the weight by ear. If there is not enough weight on the azimuth rod, the sound image will lack solidity and focus. If there is too much, the focus will be great but you will lose some speed. For each cartridge, there is a spot where you will hear ideal focus and speed. It can be with the smaller weight near the arm wand, or the heavier one at the other end of the azimuth rod. Experiment!

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Tightening the azimuth clamp

The azimuth clamp is secured with the azimuth clamp screw (see photo below).


Here also, it will be rewarding to spend some time experimenting. The clamp should be tight enough so that it cannot rock sideways when you push on it gently. If you tighten too much, you will notice some damping of the sound. Listen and determine what the best tightening position is, before there is any damage to the sound.
Remember to tighten this clamp securely if you need to grab it in order to raise or lower the bearing column (for VTA adjustment); failure to tighten it well could result in the column slipping out of the clamp!

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Anti-skating

The Telos™ is delivered with three small weights to be used for anti-skating (aka bias) adjustment.

As is explained in the section on the Talea™, which weight to choose depends on your cartridge, so it's impossible to give any general advice. Listen carefully to hear if you detect any distortion in one channel or the other; if you hear some distortion in the left channel on very dynamic passages, you probably need a bit more anti-skating compensation. If it's in the right channel, you might have too much.

Remember that some records (specially those bought used) can have been previously damaged by excessive force and no amount of anti-skating will improve them. With some cartridges, you might need very little anti-skating compensation. In general (for cartridges up to 12 g), we find that the smallest weights provided with the Telos™ is sufficient, but sometimes no weight is better than even the smallest one.

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VTA fine adjustment for the Telos™

One of our customers (John de L.) had the idea of drilling a threaded hole through the armboard of his Beat turntable, so he could adjust the VTA more easily. Here is a photo of his set up:


The screw under the armboard reaches up to the bottom of the bearing column; so by turning it one way or the other, he can raise or lower the column, and adjust the VTA very finely. This system will work with any armboard that has free access to the underside. John uses an M5 screw with nylon tip.
We followed up on his idea and installed a similar system on the armboard of a Wave Kinetics NVS:


We used a 1/4-20 set screw with nylon tip (1.5" long). It is essential to use a screw (set screw or else) with a nylon tip for this application. Any other type of screw will damage the bottom of the column and will render the system useless.

The process to modify the VTA is straightforward: loosen the clamp of the bearing column; turn the allen key to raise or lower the column; tighten the bearing column. Repeat until optimal VTA height is reached.

We have determined that it is best to lower the set screw when finished with the adjustment, because the contact of the nylon tip on the bearing column creates some undesirable damping. If you have lowered the screw after adjustment, make sure that you raise the screw next time, until it touches the bottom of the column before loosening the clamp again! (otherwise the column will suddenly drop when the clamp is loosened).

If you'd like to do this modification yourself: To determine the exact position of the threaded hole needed for this VTA adjustment device, please see the template of the base plate in the section "Telos™ Mounting Templates". The third template on this page is the drawing of the base plate (Durand Tonearms Telos BasePlate mounting holes positions). The distances of the mounting holes are referenced to the pivot point, which is at the center of the bearing column (the best position for this threaded hole).

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We have now implemented this system on other turntables: here is a photo of the same device on a Verdier La Platine armboard:


and on a Clearaudio armboard:




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